RWANDA CORRECTIONAL SERVICE

Justice, Correction, Safety, and Production

Justice, Correction, Safety, and Production

Mageragere prison to get wastewater treatment plant

The Rwanda Environment Management Authority (REMA) is partnering with Rwanda Correctional Services (RCS) to improve the management of liquid waste generated from the Nyarugenge Prison.

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The Rwanda Environment Management Authority (REMA) is partnering with Rwanda Correctional Services (RCS) to improve the management of liquid waste generated from the Nyarugenge Prison.

Through the Lake Victoria Environmental Management Project Phase Two (LVEMP II), REMA is initiating the construction works for a wastewater treatment system at the Mageragere-based prison.

The facility will treat, recycle and re-use the wastewater generated from the prison, helping to protect the surrounding environment, according to the officials.

The launch of the construction works for the facility took place on 7th December 2017, as part of the inaugural of Rwanda Green Growth Week – a series of events bringing together policy makers and practitioners to share experiences on green growth and climate resilient development.

“We put a lot of effort and resources into controlling possible sources of pollution that may damage our water bodies and reserves,” said Eng. Coletha U. Ruhamya, the Director General of REMA.

“Improving wastewater management by establishing a state-of-the-art treatment plant at Nyarugenge Prison will go a long way to ensure any potential risk of contaminating surface and groundwater reserves is contained,” she added

The waste water treatment facility will use the cost-effective Low Impact Development Technology (LID Tech) which promotes the recycling and re-use approach. The system uses environment-friendly and locally-sourced materials and tools in seeking responses to waste water management.

At Nyarugenge Prison, the resulting effluent is expected to be used for irrigation of the Community Sanitation Garden (CSG) to improve agricultural productivity of the prison in dry and rainy seasons, according to RCS Commissioner General George Rwigamba who was also present during the launch.

“We are happy for this project and the support from REMA, the new water treatment plant will turn wasted water into usable water. Water treatment project will also protect environment, this is the pilot project and we will look at feasibilities where the project can be replicated in other prisons,” said Rwigamba

RCS has 13 prisons countrywide housing over 64,000 inmates.

The pilot coverage area is 1.5 hectares that will be partitioned into paddocks of fruits, vegetables and other plants of direct use to the prison, according to RCS officials.

It is expected that 30 liters per capita per day will be treated and reused for irrigation, which implies the overall water savings and reuse of 360 m3 

The construction of the wastewater treatment system will take one month to complete and the facility is expected to be operational by end of December 2017.

Upon completion, the system will cost a total of Rwf 162,591,062 and is co-financed by REMA through LVEMP II (69% of total cost) and RCS (31%).